As the name of my blog indicates, I spend a lot of time thinking about home. Of course, my Heavenly Home is the one that is eternal, so that’s where I need to lay up my treasures, and that’s the one I’m striving for. But in the meantime, I have been given this tiny piece of the here-and-now—this nearly six-acre tract of land, this farmhouse, this domain—in which to serve Him. And, though this is in the earthly realm, I want the things that happen here to be investments in the Heavenly realm.


Friday, August 15, 2014

Anna's Cookbooks

I now have several of Great-Grandmother Anna's cookbooks.
I find them intriguing, their faded covers and taped spines and glimpses into another time.



This one is a wartime cookbook.


And isn't this one fun?


We had a chuckle reading some of the suggested daily menus.
(That's a lot of food! And we suspect that any followers of these menu plans spent much of their day in the kitchen!)


But the one I love the most is this one.


It was Anna's own collection of recipes.

I love that they are recipes that she used, and that they are recorded in her handwriting.



Later in the book, there are recipes in my Great-Aunt Minerva's (Anna's daughter's) handwriting.


There are also recipes that were clipped from the Baltimore Sun. 
They are now yellowed with age, but are fascinating glimpses into another era.


When I took these photos, I grouped them with a bouquet of zinnias
as Mom tells me that Great-Grandmother Anna planted zinnias in her yard.


Come autumn, there will be some vintage cooking in my kitchen!

12 comments:

  1. I don't have ENOUGH of my grandmother's recipes & handwriting! Oh, YOURS are treasures!

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  2. I have a couple of my grandma's handwritten recipes. How wonderful that you have such a great collection of them.

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  3. What beautiful writing and what a treasure! My mother once spent an autumn making all of her grandmother's recipes. She had a lot of fun along with a few disappointments. One was some sweet treat that she remembered fondly from childhood that didn't work out. And she dug out the potato ricer. We love riced potatoes because of that discovery. Have fun with that project! The girls are going to enjoy it, too!

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  4. What a wonderful treasury from cooks in the past. Some of those old recipes are sure to be winners.

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  5. What a treasure! I sure wish I knew what sort of meals my grandmother prepared or had recipes for what I vaguely remember.

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  6. How fortunate for you and your family that these treasures have been saved and passed down to you! ♥

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  7. I have many of my mother-in-law's recipes that she typed on index cards and sent when I first got married.

    Some of those are taken out of the box every Holiday!

    I just saw a PBS special about cooking last night. One of the sweetest ideas on there was about a woman who married a widower with three young daughters. The woman uses the notebook where their late mother had written out her favorite recipes to make them for her stepdaughters through the years.

    That way she kept the memory of their mother (who was only 39 when she died of cancer) with the girls.

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  8. This is treasure! I have a recipe written in my grandma's handwriting. I have been thinking I should frame it.


    Deanna

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  9. I love old cookbooks. Some recipes may be a little strange, but there are always lots of good ones and good memories. It is funny, but old-fashioned handwriting always looks alike! That could be my aunt's handwriting.

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  10. What a wonderful keepsake to have your great grandmother's handwritten recipes.

    I love the old cookbooks, too. I always wonder if the recipes on the stained pages were the favorites from the book.

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  11. Love this! Especially the handwritten one.

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